450 N End Ave
New York, NY 10282

Found 6 reports:

Following reports that the New York Times office had been found on the second, third and fourth floors of the Times newsroom, David Karpf, an associate professor of media and public affairs at George Washington University, decided to send a snarky tweet taking aim at Stephens, who is a frequent target for criticism on Twitter.

“Bedbugs are a pain in the ass and hard to get rid of and everybody complains a lot about them, which is kind of like how my Twitter timeline always reacts to every

Bret Stephens column,” said Karpf.

Stephens, a vociferous defender of free speech, went full-on “I’m telling your manager”. The professor said Stephens’s decision to email his superior at GWU with his complaints was an inappropriate attack from a writer with one of the highest-profile platforms in journalism.

People like Stephens who want to play respectability politics don’t comprehend the nature of political discourse if they think it must satisfy their standards of civility.

As a result, Stephens writes one of his high and mighty NY Times opinion pieces about Nazis "and the Ingredients of Slaughter." He doesn't mention Karpf or his own little laughable freakout. Considering the entire crux of Stephens' column was to suggest that comparing people to insects is setting the stage for genocide, you had to know that people were going to point out that Stephens himself has (you already saw this one coming a million miles away, right?) compared people to insects.

These were mostly just padding to his more significant point, though, which is to lament the fact that you can’t be racist in public without people getting mad at you anymore.

Evidently, his real problem with Twitter was not that it lets people unleash their ill-considered words to the public instantaneously, but that some of those disparaging words were about him. The absurd episode exposed, not for the first time and likely not the last, how the free speech double standard works for many intellectuals and politicians on the right.

It'd be stupendous to see Stephens out on his ass, but this is a systemic problem with the paper and its philosophy -- and dare I say, the naivete and gullibility of its management.

see full report...

Following reports that the New York Times office had been found on the second, third and fourth floors of the Times newsroom, David Karpf, an associate professor of media and public affairs at George Washington University, decided to send a snarky tweet taking aim at Stephens, who is a frequent target for criticism on Twitter.

“Bedbugs are a pain in the ass and hard to get rid of and everybody complains a lot about them, which is kind of like how my Twitter timeline always reacts to every

Bret Stephens column,” said Karpf.

Stephens, a vociferous defender of free speech, went full-on “I’m telling your manager”. The professor said Stephens’s decision to email his superior at GWU with his complaints was an inappropriate attack from a writer with one of the highest-profile platforms in journalism.

People like Stephens who want to play respectability politics don’t comprehend the nature of political discourse if they think it must satisfy their standards of civility.

As a result, Stephens writes one of his high and mighty NY Times opinion pieces about Nazis "and the Ingredients of Slaughter." He doesn't mention Karpf or his own little laughable freakout. Considering the entire crux of Stephens' column was to suggest that comparing people to insects is setting the stage for genocide, you had to know that people were going to point out that Stephens himself has (you already saw this one coming a million miles away, right?) compared people to insects.

These were mostly just padding to his more significant point, though, which is to lament the fact that you can’t be racist in public without people getting mad at you anymore.

Evidently, his real problem with Twitter was not that it lets people unleash their ill-considered words to the public instantaneously, but that some of those disparaging words were about him. The absurd episode exposed, not for the first time and likely not the last, how the free speech double standard works for many intellectuals and politicians on the right.

It'd be stupendous to see Stephens out on his ass, but this is a systemic problem with the paper and its philosophy -- and dare I say, the naivete and gullibility of its management.

see full report...

Following reports that the New York Times office had been found on the second, third and fourth floors of the Times newsroom, David Karpf, an associate professor of media and public affairs at George Washington University, decided to send a snarky tweet taking aim at Stephens, who is a frequent target for criticism on Twitter.

“Bedbugs are a pain in the ass and hard to get rid of and everybody complains a lot about them, which is kind of like how my Twitter timeline always reacts to every

Bret Stephens column,” said Karpf.

Stephens, a vociferous defender of free speech, went full-on “I’m telling your manager”. The professor said Stephens’s decision to email his superior at GWU with his complaints was an inappropriate attack from a writer with one of the highest-profile platforms in journalism.

People like Stephens who want to play respectability politics don’t comprehend the nature of political discourse if they think it must satisfy their standards of civility.

As a result, Stephens writes one of his high and mighty NY Times opinion pieces about Nazis "and the Ingredients of Slaughter." He doesn't mention Karpf or his own little laughable freakout. Considering the entire crux of Stephens' column was to suggest that comparing people to insects is setting the stage for genocide, you had to know that people were going to point out that Stephens himself has (you already saw this one coming a million miles away, right?) compared people to insects.

These were mostly just padding to his more significant point, though, which is to lament the fact that you can’t be racist in public without people getting mad at you anymore.

Evidently, his real problem with Twitter was not that it lets people unleash their ill-considered words to the public instantaneously, but that some of those disparaging words were about him. The absurd episode exposed, not for the first time and likely not the last, how the free speech double standard works for many intellectuals and politicians on the right.

It'd be stupendous to see Stephens out on his ass, but this is a systemic problem with the paper and its philosophy -- and dare I say, the naivete and gullibility of its management.

see full report...

Following reports that the New York Times office had been found on the second, third and fourth floors of the Times newsroom, David Karpf, an associate professor of media and public affairs at George Washington University, decided to send a snarky tweet taking aim at Stephens, who is a frequent target for criticism on Twitter.

“Bedbugs are a pain in the ass and hard to get rid of and everybody complains a lot about them, which is kind of like how my Twitter timeline always reacts to every

Bret Stephens column,” said Karpf.

Stephens, a vociferous defender of free speech, went full-on “I’m telling your manager”. The professor said Stephens’s decision to email his superior at GWU with his complaints was an inappropriate attack from a writer with one of the highest-profile platforms in journalism.

People like Stephens who want to play respectability politics don’t comprehend the nature of political discourse if they think it must satisfy their standards of civility.

As a result, Stephens writes one of his high and mighty NY Times opinion pieces about Nazis "and the Ingredients of Slaughter." He doesn't mention Karpf or his own little laughable freakout. Considering the entire crux of Stephens' column was to suggest that comparing people to insects is setting the stage for genocide, you had to know that people were going to point out that Stephens himself has (you already saw this one coming a million miles away, right?) compared people to insects.

These were mostly just padding to his more significant point, though, which is to lament the fact that you can’t be racist in public without people getting mad at you anymore.

Evidently, his real problem with Twitter was not that it lets people unleash their ill-considered words to the public instantaneously, but that some of those disparaging words were about him. The absurd episode exposed, not for the first time and likely not the last, how the free speech double standard works for many intellectuals and politicians on the right.

It'd be stupendous to see Stephens out on his ass, but this is a systemic problem with the paper and its philosophy -- and dare I say, the naivete and gullibility of its management.

see full report...

Following reports that the New York Times office had been found on the second, third and fourth floors of the Times newsroom, David Karpf, an associate professor of media and public affairs at George Washington University, decided to send a snarky tweet taking aim at Stephens, who is a frequent target for criticism on Twitter.

“Bedbugs are a pain in the ass and hard to get rid of and everybody complains a lot about them, which is kind of like how my Twitter timeline always reacts to every

Bret Stephens column,” said Karpf.

Stephens, a vociferous defender of free speech, went full-on “I’m telling your manager”. The professor said Stephens’s decision to email his superior at GWU with his complaints was an inappropriate attack from a writer with one of the highest-profile platforms in journalism.

People like Stephens who want to play respectability politics don’t comprehend the nature of political discourse if they think it must satisfy their standards of civility.

As a result, Stephens writes one of his high and mighty NY Times opinion pieces about Nazis "and the Ingredients of Slaughter." He doesn't mention Karpf or his own little laughable freakout. Considering the entire crux of Stephens' column was to suggest that comparing people to insects is setting the stage for genocide, you had to know that people were going to point out that Stephens himself has (you already saw this one coming a million miles away, right?) compared people to insects.

These were mostly just padding to his more significant point, though, which is to lament the fact that you can’t be racist in public without people getting mad at you anymore.

Evidently, his real problem with Twitter was not that it lets people unleash their ill-considered words to the public instantaneously, but that some of those disparaging words were about him. The absurd episode exposed, not for the first time and likely not the last, how the free speech double standard works for many intellectuals and politicians on the right.

It'd be stupendous to see Stephens out on his ass, but this is a systemic problem with the paper and its philosophy -- and dare I say, the naivete and gullibility of its management.

see full report...

Following reports that the New York Times office had been found on the second, third and fourth floors of the Times newsroom, David Karpf, an associate professor of media and public affairs at George Washington University, decided to send a snarky tweet taking aim at Stephens, who is a frequent target for criticism on Twitter.

“Bedbugs are a pain in the ass and hard to get rid of and everybody complains a lot about them, which is kind of like how my Twitter timeline always reacts to every

Bret Stephens column,” said Karpf.

Stephens, a vociferous defender of free speech, went full-on “I’m telling your manager”. The professor said Stephens’s decision to email his superior at GWU with his complaints was an inappropriate attack from a writer with one of the highest-profile platforms in journalism.

People like Stephens who want to play respectability politics don’t comprehend the nature of political discourse if they think it must satisfy their standards of civility.

As a result, Stephens writes one of his high and mighty NY Times opinion pieces about Nazis "and the Ingredients of Slaughter." He doesn't mention Karpf or his own little laughable freakout. Considering the entire crux of Stephens' column was to suggest that comparing people to insects is setting the stage for genocide, you had to know that people were going to point out that Stephens himself has (you already saw this one coming a million miles away, right?) compared people to insects.

These were mostly just padding to his more significant point, though, which is to lament the fact that you can’t be racist in public without people getting mad at you anymore.

Evidently, his real problem with Twitter was not that it lets people unleash their ill-considered words to the public instantaneously, but that some of those disparaging words were about him. The absurd episode exposed, not for the first time and likely not the last, how the free speech double standard works for many intellectuals and politicians on the right.

It'd be stupendous to see Stephens out on his ass, but this is a systemic problem with the paper and its philosophy -- and dare I say, the naivete and gullibility of its management.

see full report...






No nearby bug reports